Archive for June, 2011

Outtake of the Week, June 23-30

In: News

Michael Giblin is one of those super-talented musicians who practice their art in smaller cities (in Michael’s case, Harrisburg, PA), sometimes playing bigger gigs but mostly performing for a local following. Peter Case introduced us back in 2007. Michael’s band, Parallax Project, recently made an album with the great Don Dixon producing.

Anyway, Michael has an abiding love of ’70s AM radio hits, of which this song is a prime example. He sang it while opening for Peter back in March at the Harrisburg Midtown Arts Center, a wonderful venue at the corner of Third and Herr in downtown Harrisburg.

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Outtake of the Week, June 11-18

In: News

Sam Baker of Austin is a songwriter with deep roots in the West Texas soil. His songs of small-town characters and everyday experiences combine a keen journalistic eye for detail and a deep empathy with downtrodden folks. This song, “Truale,” is from the first album of his “Mercy” trilogy, and is inspired by the fight song of a Texas high school so unassuming that its mascot is the humble crawdad.

Accompanying Sam are Gurf Morlix on guitar and Audrey Auld on backing vocal. Recorded on the night I first met Sam, following a torrential thunderstorm at Fred Eaglesmith’s Charity Picnic in Aylmer, Ontario, August 2005.

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Outtake(s) of the Week, June 3-10

In: News

Although they’re mainly known for their songwriting, sometimes these troubadours will pull out a song that they learned growing up and play it just for fun. That’s what this little outtake collection is all about.

First up, Garrison Starr with a lusty singalong version of the Bangles’ biggest hit from 1989. Then, Slaid Cleaves and Charles Arthur channel Pete Townshend and the Who. Finally, Peter Case, who doesn’t drink, sings an old rock & roll chestnut about … drinking.

I hope you enjoy these as much as I do!

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About the Film

Troubadour Blues is a feature-length documentary that explores the fascinating world of traveling singer-songwriters. We see them in a variety of situations: impromptu performances, concert stages, formal and informal interviews and songwriting sessions. This is a story that needs to be heard. In our media-saturated age of instant pop stardom, there is real danger that the tradition of the itinerant working musician -- the tradition of Woody Guthrie and Leadbelly -- is being diluted or lost. Troubadour Blues explores the hidden corners of our culture, where honest, authentic songs reflecting the human experience are still being made up and sung.

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